Archive for the ‘immigration’ category

Immigrants to New Hampshire: Enemies at the Gate?

February 2, 2017

America is pretty great most of the time but I understand why many in this country disagree with that perspective.  There are a lot of disaffected individuals across the country, in large part because of the differential impacts that changing economic, social and cultural forces have had on individuals, communities, and regions of the country.  There is also no shortage of individuals, causes and movements looking to channel that disaffection.  Populism and nationalism are catalysts that can coalesce the disaffected in this and other countries into powerful and sometimes malignant forces. It is easy to see how the real disaffection accompanying economic and social change in this country, combined with legitimate desires for national security could be stoked to the point where issues requiring thoughtful policies and actions morph into something less legitimate and more pernicious.  As my favorite self-educated, longshoreman, philosopher Eric Hoffer, wrote in “The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements”  back in 1951- “Mass movements can rise and spread without belief in a God, but never without belief in a devil.”  Today in America the devil is foreigners and  in particular – but not exclusively – foreign Muslims (along with other foreigners and immigrants the media is a distant but strong second devil), but you don’t have to look too deeply to see those sentiments extending to other faiths, races, and nationalities and others (e.g. “experts”, scientists, intellectuals, “elites”.)”  That is a big step backward for a great country (that can, in fact, be made GREATER) but one who’s greatness has not been predicated on diminishing other peoples or retreating from the rest of the world.

Years ago in this blog I wrote that NH’s most valuable import was the talented individuals that arrived here from other countries. I still believe that to be true and now seems like an appropriate time to revisit that issue with some fresh data and analysis.

Unquestionably New Hampshire and New England will be economically and demographically worse off if international migration is significantly restricted.  In fact, it is hard to see a region of the country that would be more negatively affected than New England by any large scale reduction in immigration.  International migration has provided a powerful boost to the economy of New England by adding individuals to our labor force and talent to fuel our region’s innovation-dependent economy.  Always important to the region but never more so than now,  a time when New England has been on the losing end of national demographic trends that have seen more individuals in this country moving to the south and to the west.  Looking at just the past several years we see that all of the New England states experienced more people moving out to other states than moved in.  New Hampshire is again starting to see net in-migration from other states but for more than a decade the state has experienced, on average, net international migration of about 2,000 individuals annually.

net-migration

There are about 76,000 foreign born individuals living in New Hampshire.  Immigrants comprise over 6 percent of the state’s labor force (compared to 16.5 percent in the U.S. overall) but that 6 percent has an out sized importance to the state’s labor force in a number of ways.  On balance, immigrants increase the overall level of educational attainment of New Hampshire’s adult population.   Examining data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s “American Community Survey” 5 year estimates (2011-15), the chart below shows that 40 percent of the foreign born population age 25 and above in NH has a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to 34 percent for U.S. born residents of the state.  A higher percentage of foreign born residents living in NH have not graduated from high school but overall the chart shows that  compared to the foreign born population across the U.S., immigrants in NH have significantly higher levels of educational attainment.

ed-attainment-of-immigrants

Immigrants represent a high percentage of individuals in New Hampshire with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) degrees.  There is no single definition of what constitutes a STEM degree but examining Census data on the first college degree (bachelor’s) received by working individuals in NH, age 25 and above, it is not difficult to reasonably classify the 172 different degrees as STEM or not.

Among NH’s foreign born adult population that holds at least a bachelor’s degree, 46 percent hold a degree in a stem field, compared to just 24 percent for native born NH residents.

immigrant-pct-with-stem-degree

Despite comprising just over 6 percent of NH’s workforce, foreign born individuals account for 16.5 percent of all working NH residents with a STEM degree, a percentage nearly equal to that of NH born residents of the state.

immigrant-pct-of-stem

Finally, examining specific occupations shows just how important immigrants are to the supply of many occupations in the state..  Foreign born residents comprise 20 percent of the computer-related occupations held by NH residents.  Fully 20 percent of physicians, surgeons, and other high-level medical occupations are held by foreign born residents of New Hampshire. Foreign born residents also hold a relatively large percentage (11.5%) of production jobs in the state.  Among lower-skill occupations foreign born residents hold 21 percent of maid and housekeeping positions and 13 percent of janitorial occupations. The figure below highlights the impact of immigrants on the supply of occupations in NH for several of the more than 400 occupations examined.  Only occupations held by 1,000 or more NH residents are included.

immigrant-share-of-occupationsSupporters of migration bans and limits say that the limits on immigration would only apply to refugees (not comforting to me for a number of non-economic reasons), undocumented immigrants, or those with a criminal past.  But with the rhetoric and actions coming from Washington it is hard to see anti-immigration policies stopping there.

PureHost is “PureHell” and a Reprise of a Cautionary Column

January 15, 2013

Unless I send-out email notifications about posts on this blog I don’t get a lot of readers. Either I don’t have much of anything interesting to post or people have more than enough to look at without needing another nerdy economic and policy blog to read.  I’d put-up a poll to determine which is more responsible if I weren’t afraid of the results.   Thanks to my web host (PureHost or “PureHell” as I have come to know it) any email that contains a link to my or another WordPress blog is filtered from outgoing or incoming email – thus no email notices to eager readers who just need a little prompting about the “can’t live without” information in this blog.

So while I spend another day with poor tech support trying to resolve the email foible, Ive decided to reprise a column (slightly shortened) that I wrote for Business New Hampshire Magazine after the November 2010 elections.   It is a cautionary opine about the election results and in retrospect holds-up pretty well.  I liked it in 2010 and I like it as much now –  Business New Hampshire Magazine liked it so much that they stopped asking me to write a policy column shortly thereafter.

(From a January 2011 Column I Wrote for Business NH Magazine)

The  Double-Edged Sword of Populism

“Mass movements can rise and spread without belief in a God, but never without belief in a devil.”

      Eric Hoffer “The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements” (1951)

The tsunami that swept conservative Republicans into elective office this past November is due, in large part, to a mass movement called the Tea Party that shook the political ground and released seismic levels of populist energy in New Hampshire and across the country.

It’s a businesses community’s dream if the November election produces a public policy agenda of smaller government, lower taxes, and fewer regulations.  The big government, more regulation, higher spending, and bailout policies of recent years are the “devil” that unified the Tea Party movement in New Hampshire and the nation and what makes the movement’s agenda attractive to many business leaders.  But neither seismic nor populist energy is predictable, and neither has yet been effectively harnessed.

From its inception in 2009 through the November elections, what the Tea Party was against was more important to the business community than what the movement was for.  As long as the business community and Tea Party populism share as their common “devil,” big government, more regulations and more spending, then their interests are generally aligned.    But many, if not a majority in the loosely defined Tea Party movement have no love for much of the business world – big business, finance, insurance,  and multi-national companies to name a few – they just happen to dislike President Obama and most Democrats more.

What “devil” will unify and sustain the populist movement after it has vanquished Democrats and/or big government?  For businesses in New Hampshire, especially larger corporations, the stakes are large.   The anti-immigration sympathies of Tea Party populists will clash with New Hampshire businesses increasing need to hire technology workers.  The average educational attainment of foreign-born workers in New Hampshire is higher than that of its native-born population.  About 45 percent of New Hampshire’s foreign-born residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher (the second highest of any state in the nation) compared to about one-third of native-born residents. Foreign born residents in New Hampshire make up an especially large percentage (32%) of al PhD’s and young workers age 25 to 34 with graduate degrees (24%).  Thirty (30) percent of computer programmers in New Hampshire are foreign born as are 25 percent of the software engineers in the state.

Populist calls for protectionism and anti-globalization sentiments can also threaten what will be about $4 billion in exports by New Hampshire manufacturers in 2010, as well as the jobs that those sales support, up about 60 percent from $2.5 billion just since 2005,.  In addition, the New Hampshire economy relies more on foreign direct investment than all but three states.  In 2008, almost seven percent of workers in New Hampshire were employed by foreign-owned firms.

New Hampshire’s economic successes over the past several decades are the result of a transition to an innovation-dependent, technology-rich, economy that increasingly relies on workers with higher levels of educational attainment, across virtually all industries.   Research and development, strong universities, high performing schools, attracting and retaining talented employees, and a reputation for being “ahead of the curve,” all support innovation.  There are different ways policy makers can support or facilitate innovation but it is critical that they recognize its importance.

The recent election is sure to produce many spending, revenue, and regulatory policies in New Hampshire that will please most businesses.  But at least a portion of the business community should be wary of becoming a unifying “devil” of the populist movement.   Small business is off- the-hook and it is easy to see why.  Most small businesses receive no loans, subsidies or other support from the government, and relatively few sell goods and services outside of the U.S. or hire any foreign-born workers.  Moreover, most of the high-profile public policies that energize the populist movement have their greatest impacts and generate the largest costs for small businesses.  Not all Americans love businesses or even capitalism, but they increasingly worship small business, according to one public opinion poll, small business is viewed more favorably by the public than are churches.

Big government is at the top of a short list of unifying ‘devils’ needed to sustain today’s populist movement, but “big” business isn’t far behind.  While occasionally justified, in New Hampshire it would be unfortunate.  New Hampshire is home to world-class, innovative businesses whose connections throughout the world benefit the state’s economy.  Financial institutions in the state have avoided the practices that evoked populist outrage and their lending has been a key to the milder recession and stronger recovery of our state’s economy.  Only about 100 New Hampshire businesses have more than 500 employees and only 260 have more than 250 employees, but combined they employ one-third of all workers in the state.  That is far from a majority, but if a movement targets businesses employing one-third of New Hampshire’s workers, it is best described as something other than populist.

NH’s Most Valuable Import?

December 11, 2012

I write a lot about the importance of skilled individuals with higher levels of educational attainment to the prospects for our nation’s and NH’s economic growth and prosperity.  I’ve also written about how important the in-migration of skilled individuals with higher levels of educational attainment from other states to NH has been to NH’s economic success.

I know  foreign immigration to the U.S. is a hot-button issue in this country and an increasingly high-profile one in cities like Manchester in NH.  Whether because of economics, legitimate  fiscal concerns, or simple xenophobia,  for many, foreign immigration is viewed with concern, skepticism, and sometimes hostility.  While some cities and school districts are more challenged by differing characteristics of immigrant populations in NH, on balance, foreign born individuals add significantly to the overall level of skill and educational attainment of the workforce in NH.  The chart below shows how much higher is the educational attainment of the foreign-born workforce in NH than it is in the U.S. as whole.

Ed Attainment by Place of Birth US and NH

Comparing foreign born workers in NH to U.S. born workers in NH shows that foreign born workers are much more likely to have a graduate or professional degree than are U.S. born workers age 25-34.  Foreign born workers comprise a disproportionately large percentage of NH residents with graduate and professional degrees and that is reflected in many of the highest skill occupations in the state.  Which, of course, will be the subject of a future post.

Ed attainment by birth ages 25 to 34

What’s Behind NH’s Recent Net Out-Migration?

November 1, 2012

I’ve written often about how important the ability to attract skilled, well-educated individuals is to NH’s past and future economic success.  Appropriately, there is much concern over NH’s recent population losses resulting  from movements of residents into and out-of the state and what it says about NH’s relative attractiveness.  Not surprisingly, that concern  results in many simplistic, inaccurate, and analytical flawed explanations for the patterns of migration to and from NH.  I don’t have a book, video, seminar, or anything else to sell that depends of any particular explanation for NH’s migration patterns so I will let the data , as it becomes clearer, shape and evolve my theories on the phenomenon.

Here is the basic scenario:  NH has traditionally been a magnet for residents moving from another state (most prominently from  another Northeastern state – especially MA). During the past decade NH has attracted less net in-migration from other states, especially during the second half of the decade, culminating in net out-migration at the end of the decade.  The resulting concern by many (including me) is that NH may be losing its fundamental attractiveness relative to other states.  Because NH has relied on in-migration to fuel growth in “human capital” and the economy, this would imply very bad things about the future of our state.  I worry a lot about NH’s attractiveness  but my answer to the question of whether the state has lost its attractiveness is: “no…….not yet“.   Lets look at migration to and from the state during the recession (chart below). During the recession the patterns of the past several decades were largely the same – albeit with different magnitudes.  NH gained and lost a  lot of residents from other Northeastern states, and smaller numbers from other states in the South and West.

The difference in recent years has been that the positive net flows to  NH have been smaller for states that traditionally send NH a lot of residents (the Northeast), while the states with whom NH traditionally has net negative outflows have been larger (largely states in the south and west).   But is this a sign that NH is now less attractive?  I don’t think so (yet) and here is why. Since the housing and financial crisis and subsequent recession, the U.S. Census Bureau reports that state-to-state movement in the U.S. (on a % basis) has been about as low as it ever has been.  One reason for that,  many economists believe, is the fact that there were fewer places to move to that had stronger economic growth that often drives migration.  But another important factor has been the phenomenon of “housing lock.”

Because of the housing market bust and subsequent housing equity, credit and financial issues, both the selling and buying of homes were disrupted or impossible for large numbers of homeowners in NH and across the country.  That has especially profound impacts on net migration to NH.  I can’t explain in detail here, but migration patterns in NH indicate that the state has been especially attractive to and a magnate  for  30-44 yr. old, two wage-earner married couple families with children.  To move to NH they typically have to sell a house in their  native state and buy one in NH.  Each of those was a lot more difficult at the end of the last decade.  I believe this  reduced our core demographic of  potential  in-migrants.  At the same time, the housing market crash had less of an effect on the ability of the young, and non-homeowners to move from state-to-state.  This is the demographic group that traditionally has shown net out-migration from NH.  So the groups most likely to choose NH were most constrained from doing so during the last half of the 2000s, while the groups most likely to leave NH were not constrained from doing so by “housing lock” or other housing market issues.  The result – much lower rates of net in-migration to the state.  This explanation doesn’t account for all of the recent decline in net migration to NH, but it surely has played a significant role in the trend.


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