How Much Should We Pay to Save a Steel Mill Job?

There are about 86,000 steel mill jobs in the United States, down from a decade ago when it was about 100,000. At its nadir in early 2017, steel mill jobs were under 81,000. About 6,000 jobs have come back since tariffs were introduced, but the producer price index (PPI) for steel mill products also soared as a result. The value of U.S. steel mill output was about $78 billion before tariffs while the producer price index for steel mill products has risen just over 20% since tariffs . Those numbers imply a cost of tariffs to purchasers of U.S. steel mill products (U.S. companies and governments) of about $16 billion, as well as a cost per job saved of about $2.7 million. If instead of tariffs the U.S. had offered each of the 6,000 laid-off steel mill workers a generous $100,000 stipend per year for 3 years to replace lost pay and benefits and to retrain, it would have cost $1.8 billion, saving U.S. companies and governments $14.2 billion in tariff-related costs. A  less than 1% surcharge on imported and U.S. steel mill products could have paid for such a policy without adding to government debt. I’m not arguing for such a policy but that 1% seems like a small price to pay to avoid punishing 20% price hikes.

Steel Prices and Emp

Explore posts in the same categories: International trade, manufacturing, Tariffs, Uncategorized

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One Comment on “How Much Should We Pay to Save a Steel Mill Job?”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    Brian, it s a bit like tilting at windmills to expect this administration to do anything based on logic, but please keep tilting. It will be so nice to know (even when you don’t say it) “I told you so!”


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